Alberta dating violence

“Ultimately, those patterns that we see in schoolhouses continue into adulthood … Dating violence is defined as a systematic pattern of domination where one partner uses abusive tactics to maintain power and control over the other partner and where these tactics escalate over time and where the victim alters her behaviour in an attempt to stop the abuse.Ninety-three percent of principals said they referred student victims of dating violence to counselors, while 85 percent said they informed the victim’s parents or guardians.Yet federal data indicate that many public schools, particularly high-poverty campuses, lack counselors. More than one-third of 10th-graders (35 percent) have been physically or verbally abused by dating partners, while a similar percentage are perpetrators of such abuse. are physically abused by dating partners every year.

Further, when principals were presented with several options and asked to identify the largest barrier to assisting student victims, the second most-common response—following lack of training—was that “dating violence is a minor issue compared with other student health issues we deal with.”According to Jagdish Khubchandani, the associate professor of health science at Ball State University and the study’s lead author, some school principals are hampered by faculty and staff without sufficient skills and training; others, meanwhile, mistakenly perceive dating violence as a typical, trivial teenage problem.

All of this negatively affects academic achievement.

Yet in the face of mounting evidence of harm—and several decades of research and analysis—addressing teen dating violence remains a low priority in public schools, according to a new report published in the peer-reviewed journal For the study, researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of high-school principals on their knowledge of teen dating violence—defined in the study as verbal, physical, emotional, or sexual abuse—as well as their schools’ policies, and their beliefs about the role of school personnel in both preventing dating abuse and assisting victims.

A member of the Domestic Violence Network’s middle- and high-school Youth Network, De Leon plans activities to inform students about unsafe or unhealthy relationships.

She’s also a student leader with the “No More Club,” which seeks to end the silence on dating abuse.

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