Archeological dating technique

Chronometric methods include radiocarbon, potassium-argon, fission-track, and thermoluminescence.

The most commonly used chronometic method is radiocarbon analysis.

Stratigraphic dating is based on the principle of depositional superposition of layers of sediments called strata.

They do not, however, give "absolute" dates because they merely provide a statistical probability that a given date falls within a certain range of age expressed in years.

Radioactive carbon has a half-life of approximately 5,730 years which means that every 5,730 years, half of the carbon-14 will have decayed.

This number is usually written as a range, with plus or minus 40 years (1 standard deviation of error) and the theoretical absolute limit of this method is 80,000 years ago, although the practical limit is close to 50,000 years ago.

It does not, however, allow one to independently assign an accurate estimation of the age of an object as expressed in years.

The most common relative dating method is stratigraphy.

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