Cross validating a bidimensional mathematics anxiety scale

When controlling for TA, the negative correlation between MA and performance remained for girls only.Regression analyses revealed that MA was a significant predictor of performance for girls but not for boys.Four-hundred and thirty three British secondary school children in school years 7, 8 and 10 completed customised mental mathematics tests and MA and TA questionnaires.No gender differences emerged for mathematics performance but levels of MA and TA were higher for girls than for boys.Therefore MA warrants attention in the mathematics classroom, particularly because there is evidence that MA develops during the primary school years.Furthermore, our study showed no gender difference in mathematics performance, despite girls reporting higher levels of MA.Our study has revealed that secondary school children experience MA.Importantly, we controlled for TA which is typically not controlled for in MA studies.

and -.34 in two meta-analyses) [11,19-24], indicating that those with high MA show poorer mathematics achievement.On the other hand some research has indicated that boys' mathematics performance is more negatively affected by MA than girls' performance is.The aim of the current study was to measure girls' and boys' mathematics performance as well as their levels of MA while controlling for test anxiety (TA) a construct related to MA but which is typically not controlled for in MA studies.This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.On the other hand some research has indicated that boys’ mathematics performance is more negatively affected by MA than girls’ performance is.

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